food costs challenge – june 2019 report

It’s time for the first full month report for our Food Costs Challenge! June was just about spot on for our target restaurant/fast food spend!

Our goal was $350, and so at $352.40, we were right there! You can also see that our frequency was one of the lowest of the previous year.

So how did it feel? With the exception of being tired a couple nights when we cooked (where we would have previously gone out to eat at a restaurant), it felt pretty okay. We had just a couple of additional conversations where we were deciding when to go out to eat and when to stay home. It didn’t feel hard to me really, probably because…

…we spent significantly more on groceries. We spent $906.48 on groceries, which is so absolutely insane for 3 adults and a child! Our total food costs for the month of June was $1,298.88. So. Much.

I know that we are going to need to address our food costs as a whole. We tent to buy bulk, so I’m hoping that our monthly average goes down over time. We have also had some conversations about making larger quantity, lower cost meals. With an Instant Pot, crockpot, and someone here in the day to start something if we need it, we really shouldn’t have any problems making 2-3 large meals (with 8-10 servings) throughout the week.

I’d love to be between $750-$850 per month for food costs for our family. I think that is a really reasonable goal to aim for. And wow, that’s $500 less than this month. Imagine what we could be doing with the additional $500/month! It’s time to reign it in!

So tell me reader, how was your June? What amazing meal did you eat? What do you think of our June report?

Cheers!
Mel

food costs challenge – june 2019 check in

Hi reader!

Welcome to our June 2019 check in! One of our main goals right now is to reduce our restaurant (including fast food) costs. Over the course of the past year, we averaged approximately $520 per month on restaurant costs. Insane. Our first food challenge goal (of hopefully many) is to keep our restaurant costs to $350 or less per month.

For the first half of the month, we are at $166.16! Just under half, so not bad! We had some family in town from out-of-state that bought a big meal for us, and we bought some additional food to accommodate them as well. What we have found this first month, is that we’re spending a lot more on expensive groceries. I know we’ll tackle the general grocery costs at some point, because those are exorbitant as well.

Reader, let’s hear about your food goals! Do you have any expenses that you are following closely? Or maybe it’s all of your expenses… drop me a line in the comments and let me know!

Cheers!
Mel

personal finance structuring

Hi again reader,

Before Al and I got married, our accounts were totally separate. We had a number of conversations about whether or not to combine our finances, and to what extent. At the time, we ultimately decided to keep one or more accounts in our individual names, and then open joint accounts from which we would pay bills.

Since we’ve recently started digging into our finances, I’ve become increasingly frustrated with the way that we’ve been managing our accounts, so we decided to make some changes, and things are now structured like this (some of this has changed, and other parts have remained the same over a long period of time):

  • Joint credit card: This is the card we use the most, where we get our cash back, etc. We pay off all of our credit cards every month. We also have a Lowe’s card (only ever used at Lowe’s) and will soon be closing another credit card.
  • Joint checking: This is where we pay our bills from, including the joint credit card. Auto-payments for recurring expenses come out of this account. We both contribute to it from our personal checking/savings (see below).
  • Joint emergency savings: This is for true emergencies. We are establishing a goal that’ll allow us to pay at least 3 months of our mortgage plus a bit more. We may up it in the future to include more expenses, but for the short term (and because we have the next account), we’re not going to include all monthly expenses.
  • Joint house savings: This account allows us to save for house projects. In the past, we’ve just waited to do larger projects until our joint checking filled up enough, but we wanted to be much more intentional about the way that we do these projects. We will contribute to this account regularly, and when we have a project that we want to tackle, we’ll deplete it (by using our joint credit card and paying it off with this account so that we get the cash back) and then rebuild it.
  • Personal/individual checking and savings accounts: My paycheck gets deposited into my personal checking account, and then I divvy up the money for the above-listed accounts. After each paycheck, I keep a few hundred dollars in both my personal checking account and also my savings. If I use my Target debit card to save 5%, it comes out of my checking, and I use my personal savings for things like buying gifts for my husband. I honestly don’t keep track of the intention of his personal accounts, because he’s very diligent about transferring the money and never misses paying bills; however, I can see these on Mint if I need to.

We can see everything on Mint.com, with the exception of Bo’s 529, since that’s not money for us. All of our accounts (checking, savings, credit cards), debts (just our mortgage right now), investments (our 457b deferred compensation), property/assets, etc. can be seen by both of us. I think it works really well for us.

Do you manage your own finances, share responsibilities, or split the responsibilities? I am always curious as to how others manage their personal finances! Do you have questions or suggestions for us? Drop a comment below, reader!

Cheers,
Mel

challenge: reducing our food costs

Dear Reader, hold on to your pants. You’re about to see some big numbers!

Let’s start this post out with total honesty: We spend too much money on food. I could feel it in my soul. And with financial independence (FI) as an ultimate goal, I decided to dig in to the numbers. Though I have pretty much ignored it for years (problem numero uno), we have always had Mint.com. I logged in and started going through transactions. And our transactions can be summed up like this: Restaurant, restaurant, fast food, amazon, restaurant, restaurant, restaurant, restaurant….

I decided to go to only 2 food categories to try to help me see clearly where money is going in regards to food, and because I know eating out is more expensive than eating at home. Now we have Groceries and Restaurants (which includes fast food). Then, I looked at the bottom line for the Food category.

We spend about $1200/mo on food.

And the restaurant piece of that is ridiculous. Let’s take a look:

The two highest months are months that we traveled extensively, which makes sense to me. But that’s over 250 times in 11 months! That’s an average of over 20 times per month, and over $500/month of spending.

I talked to my husband about this. We’ve always been great about working towards a goal. Some might say that we are a bit too inflexible when we are working towards something, but I think that’s great for this type of thing. So, we’re challenging ourselves to spend no more than $350/month on restaurants. Whether or not we meet this mark, I’ll be documenting this journey on the blog. I will have a mid-month check-in and a post-month report post. Since May is pretty much a bust, I’ll start with my mid-June check-in.

And very soon, I will find out if this number is either painful or attainable. But heck, $150 of savings is a lot of money per month! And since I need to focus on one thing at a time, I’ll be tackling even more aspects of our food costs in the future.

So join me for this challenge by posting updates or links below, and I will follow along. I’d love to see how other people manage their food costs.

Cheers,
Mel