smashing FIRE goals

Hey reader, we achieved big FIRE goals this week!

Al and I both found out what our salaries are going to be for the new biennium at the GovJobs, and we maxed out our 457b deferred compensation contributions! We had been talking about doing slower increases for the contributions, but ultimately we decided to do it now. Short term pain, long term gain, right?

When we started with the GovJobs, neither of us knew the details of the 457’s and what they could do for us in the long-run. Let’s look at some numbers about the contributions:

  • We are contributing $791/paycheck, which is $3,166 (pre-tax) for our household.
  • Although we won’t hit the limit for 2019, we will hit the $38k limit for the following year and plan to continue those contributions.
  • The software application says that I am contributing 215% toward my goal and would make $105k/year in retirement if I retire at 65. Little does it know…
  • It also says that for my age range (30-39), gender (female), and salary range ($75-$100k), my average peer is contributing 6%, the “Top Peers” (whatever that means) are at 15%, and I am at 28%.

It’s going to be a little painful this summer, because we have some big expenses coming up. Since our whole HVAC system needed to be replaced, we’ll be financing the replacement with a 0% 12-month loan, which I’m estimating will cost us over $1k/month (estimating around $15k for total replacement).

And now our paychecks will be smaller. But I’m pretty sure we can swing it because we don’t have any other major plans in the works for things like major trips/vacations, large expenses, etc. Honestly, we just need to start living within our (new) means.

What FIRE goals are you working on, reader?

Cheers!
Mel

personal finance structuring

Hi again reader,

Before Al and I got married, our accounts were totally separate. We had a number of conversations about whether or not to combine our finances, and to what extent. At the time, we ultimately decided to keep one or more accounts in our individual names, and then open joint accounts from which we would pay bills.

Since we’ve recently started digging into our finances, I’ve become increasingly frustrated with the way that we’ve been managing our accounts, so we decided to make some changes, and things are now structured like this (some of this has changed, and other parts have remained the same over a long period of time):

  • Joint credit card: This is the card we use the most, where we get our cash back, etc. We pay off all of our credit cards every month. We also have a Lowe’s card (only ever used at Lowe’s) and will soon be closing another credit card.
  • Joint checking: This is where we pay our bills from, including the joint credit card. Auto-payments for recurring expenses come out of this account. We both contribute to it from our personal checking/savings (see below).
  • Joint emergency savings: This is for true emergencies. We are establishing a goal that’ll allow us to pay at least 3 months of our mortgage plus a bit more. We may up it in the future to include more expenses, but for the short term (and because we have the next account), we’re not going to include all monthly expenses.
  • Joint house savings: This account allows us to save for house projects. In the past, we’ve just waited to do larger projects until our joint checking filled up enough, but we wanted to be much more intentional about the way that we do these projects. We will contribute to this account regularly, and when we have a project that we want to tackle, we’ll deplete it (by using our joint credit card and paying it off with this account so that we get the cash back) and then rebuild it.
  • Personal/individual checking and savings accounts: My paycheck gets deposited into my personal checking account, and then I divvy up the money for the above-listed accounts. After each paycheck, I keep a few hundred dollars in both my personal checking account and also my savings. If I use my Target debit card to save 5%, it comes out of my checking, and I use my personal savings for things like buying gifts for my husband. I honestly don’t keep track of the intention of his personal accounts, because he’s very diligent about transferring the money and never misses paying bills; however, I can see these on Mint if I need to.

We can see everything on Mint.com, with the exception of Bo’s 529, since that’s not money for us. All of our accounts (checking, savings, credit cards), debts (just our mortgage right now), investments (our 457b deferred compensation), property/assets, etc. can be seen by both of us. I think it works really well for us.

Do you manage your own finances, share responsibilities, or split the responsibilities? I am always curious as to how others manage their personal finances! Do you have questions or suggestions for us? Drop a comment below, reader!

Cheers,
Mel